The making-money-from-the-Internet industry is huge, and there is no shortage of sites that purport to hold the secrets to getting rich on the Internet.

The making-money-from-the-Internet industry is huge, and there is no shortage of sites that purport to hold the secrets to getting rich on the Internet.

If you’re reading this page then you’ve more than likely seen these websites. Generally they follow similar templates. Often they claim to hold an underground, closely guarded system or piece of software that does everything for you, and all you need to do it set everything up and watch the money roll in.

The website will probably use a much hyped sales video that focuses on promoting the financially free millionaire lifestyle and how easy it is to get started, instead of telling you what the product actually is or giving you any realistic or informed insight as to the required effort to actually make substantial money from the Internet. The site will probably tell you there is a limited time discount or joining time, may be that the “video won’t be up for much longer”. If you try to exit the site you’ll be bombarded with further discounts and requests for your email address.

English: We generate money by serving Google t...

English: We generate money by serving Google text advertisements on a network of hidden Websites. With this money we automatically buy Google shares. We buy Google via their own advertisement! Google eats itself – but in the end “we” own it! View of the overhead projector installation in South Africa. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Ultimately these websites, whilst they do sell real information, promote one massive fallacy that has plagued the Internet marketing industry for years. That there is some easy, effortless and quick way of getting rich, and you can experience financial freedom as soon as you pay the registration fee.

And this is why these websites are listed on our websites as get-rich-quick scams. It is this fallacy that causes those who sign up to become confused, because the product they receive doesn’t match the hyped sales pitch, because the sales pitch of course is just to get people to sign up. Those who sign up do not realise that the reality is much less glamorous or effortless than what the program projected in that sales video. And it ultimately causes people to fail at making money.
Not only that but get-rich-quick schemes will bombard those who do sign up with upsells. This means further pressuring to pay more money to compliment the “powerful system” they have just purchased for optimal results.

The Internet is littered with complaints about these programs from those that sign up and didn’t achieve the unrealistic results purported in the sales video. Often these genuine complaints can be difficult to find because of the many “reviews” praising the program that often clutter on the first several pages of Google results. These reviews however are affiliated reviews (or reviews written by the program creator). Affiliated reviews are essentially bogus reviews where the author will receive a commission if they persuade someone to sign up to the program. Whilst affiliated reviews are a genuine form of marketing, such reviews will typically reiterate the same fallacies that the get-rich-quick scheme promotes, making them unethical.

English: This trust seal certificate is issued...

English: This trust seal certificate is issued by http://integrity-safe.com (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


Of course if you are interested in making money from the Internet the good news is that it is entirely possible to do that.

There is a wealth of free information available

that teaches you how to do it properly.

There are also legitimate training programs available

that will teach you the fundamentals to Internet marketing, not by selling you “programs” or “systems” but by providing a structured and in-depth approach without all the silly, confused hype and unrealistic projections. If you are interested you can visit that section of our site here.
http://www.thatsnonsense.com/viewdef.php?article=get_rich_quick_scams

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The term “get rich quick scam” is actually an oxymoron.

Better Business Bureau logo.

Better Business Bureau logo. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

English: A list of all scams in India from yea...

English: A list of all scams in India from years 1992 to 2010. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The term “get rich quick scam” is actually an oxymoron.

The truth is, with these scams, the last thing that’s going to happen is you getting rich quick. The problem is recognizing these scams. Hopefully, after reading this article, you’ll have a pretty good idea of how to recognize one of these scams when they cross your path.

The best thing about a get rich quick scam is that most are really pretty transparent when all is said and done.

Most of the websites that promote these scams have headers that read something like “Turn $20 Into $20,000 In 30 Days” or “Make $30,000 In 30 Days, GUARANTEED!” You know the ones that I’m talking about. They seem to be all over the Internet.

Well, over the course of the 4 years plus that I have been online, I have tested out over 150 of these get rich quick scams. Of all the ones I tried, only one made me any money at all and that was $28 that took me 5 months to earn. The sad part was that many of the programs actually turned out to be fraudulent altogether. They would take off with your money and you’d never hear from them again no matter how many times you emailed them.

Then there are the get rich quick scams that get sent to your email box.

You know the ones that I’m talking about. Some lady out in Nigeria just lost her dear husband and she wants you to help her get all this money. In helping her, she’ll send you something like $10 million or some insane amount. All you have to do is give this person your personal bank account information and in 24 hours you’ll be a millionaire. I sometimes wonder about the person’s intelligence who actually falls for something like this.

Get rich quick scams come in all shapes and sizes, which is what makes spotting them all so hard.

So the easiest way to spot one is to simply ask yourself one question. “Does this sound too good to be true?” If the answer to this question is a resounding “YES!” then most likely the “opportunity” in question is a scam and should be avoided at all costs.

If by some chance you stumble upon one of these scams and get taken in, don’t just chalk it up to a bad experience. The only way to stop these scams is to report them. So go to the BBB and file a complaint against the company. If more people were to do this, these companies would be shut down quickly and there wouldn’t be as many scams going around. Problem is, most people are just too lazy to do anything about it.

I’ve long stopped falling for these scams and now enjoy making a comfortable living from home with my own business. If you want to actually earn an honest income at home and not have to worry about being taken in, check out the site in my signature.

You don’t have to go on being a victim.

To YOUR Success,

Steven Wagenheim

Tired of getting ripped off. Want to make an honest living on the Internet? Check out my site at http://www.honestincomeprogram.com/ and start to earn an honest income for once in your life.

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